mealworms

Feeding Bluebirds

Everybody would like to attract Bluebirds. The fact is it is not difficult to attract Bluebirds and the single best way to do that is with a couple of nest boxes placed in good locations as we pointed out in previous blogs. (Click here for tips on bluebird box placement.) We want to help you attract Bluebirds and enjoy the entire experience from courtship to nest building, egg laying to chick development, and finally fledging.

Besides the nest boxes planting native berry producing trees and shrubs, like Dogwood and Beautyberry, for example, having a consistent source of water, and offering an appealing food source like live mealworms are things that will help. Eastern Bluebirds feed primarily on insects and berries, so feeding them is very different than the way we feed other birds. At The Wood Thrush Shop we have a great deal of experience feeding Bluebirds and would like to pass on our tips and tricks to help you have success and enjoy the activity as much as we do. We really don’t think presenting mealworms before Bluebirds are seen is a good strategy. In other words it is not likely to attract them. All you are doing is presenting this very desirable food source to a lot of other birds.

The best time to begin offering live mealworms is when Bluebirds begin consistently checking out a nest-box. Their need for nest boxes takes precedence during the breeding season and will bring them to your yard more predictably and reliably, and potentially for several months. Feeding them then becomes a lot easier after they have found a nest-box.

Seeing Bluebirds perched on top of the box and carrying nest material is a great time to offer mealworms.

Seeing Bluebirds perched on top of the box and carrying nest material is a great time to offer mealworms.

Bluebirds will often cling to the front of the box and look in when interested in a nesting sight.

Bluebirds will often cling to the front of the box and look in when interested in a nesting sight.

Once you see Bluebirds showing interest in a nest box be prepared to offer mealworms. The type of feeder to use is really not very important. My choice of feeder is a small clay dish which is placed on a large rock which is easily seen from the top of the nest-box, just a few feet away. Platform type feeders tend to work very well, too.

Look for an opportunity to walk out to the feeder and offer a small amount of worms, maybe a dozen. THIS IS IMPORTANT! The key is to make sure the Bluebirds are there to see you make the offering.

After placing the worms in the feeder walk away and watch. In most cases you will have immediate success. They fly right down to the dish and gobble them up. I like to repeat this after they consume the first offering just to reinforce the process. I repeat this little scene every time the opportunity arises over the course of the next few days or weeks. Usually 4 or 5 times is enough for the Bluebirds to catch on to what you are doing. If during that first offering they fly away do not leave the mealworms there. The longer the worms are there the greater the likelihood that other birds, like Robins, Mockingbirds, or Starlings see them. If these birds catch on to this offering feeding the Bluebirds will then become almost impossible, not to mention possibly creating enough conflict the Bluebirds may look elsewhere to nest.

Both Mockingbirds and Robins share the same food preferences as Bluebirds and being bigger birds will vigorously defend a food source like mealworms. If you slip up and allow larger more aggressive birds to compete for the worms we suggest a reset. Stop putting out worms for a week or two and begin the process again. Better to be patient than to create an adverse situation.

So, keep the offerings minimal until the Bluebirds really catch on. Then you can increase the amounts of mealworms being offered as they raise their young. Soon they will be anticipating the offering, or even seeking you out in your yard as I’ve experienced in the past.TIPS For Feeding Bluebirds:

  • Offering mealworms when Bluebirds are not present is a sure way to feed a lot of other birds. Wait until you see them before offering.

  • If birds that you do not want are getting the mealworms suspend offering the mealworms for a few days or more and start over using the suggestions we’ve outlined.

  • Bluebirds may partake of other foods like dried mealworms, suet, Bluebird nuggets (a type of suet), raisins, blueberries, chopped apple and grape. Experiment and let us know your results.

  • Location is important. Don’t try to feed them near birdfeeders or a place that gets a lot of bird traffic. Feeding them close to their chosen nest box is easiest but do make sure you don’t let other birds in on the mealworms treat. Some birds may become territorial over the food source and create conflict at the Bluebird box.

  • Some people employ the method of making a sound, like whistling, while they offer the worms. Bluebirds will key in on the sound and associate that with the treat about to be given them. Its simple conditioning. I’m convinced that the Bluebirds we fed behind the store one year became familiar with the sound and sight of my truck arriving in the morning. As soon as I would get out of the truck they would be landing on nearby perches waiting for me to enter the store and bring out worms.

Remember, Bluebirds will not become dependent on the mealworms but will simply take advantage while they are offered. You can suspend feeding Bluebirds any time and not worry that they will be adversely affected.

Domed feeders can be adjusted to help discourage larger birds.

Domed feeders can be adjusted to help discourage larger birds.

Bluebird feeders can be any small dish or tray. however I would not put this many mealworms out at one time.

Bluebird feeders can be any small dish or tray. however I would not put this many mealworms out at one time.

Barrier type feeders will limit the size of bird that can feed. These feeders may take longer to train your birds to use.

Barrier type feeders will limit the size of bird that can feed. These feeders may take longer to train your birds to use.

……Next week Spring visitors are coming! We will outline some of the more notable feeder birds you may see.

Wood Thrush Shop News and Updates

Happy Friday all!

We’ve had two days in a row of fantastic sunshine but it appears we may have another warm up Monday giving way to a 30 degrees drop on Tuesday with snow. We’re stocked up with plenty of feed so keep your feathered and furred friends in mind. Remember to be extra aware of the birds at your feeders during “wintery” weather. This tends to be when the more unusual birds appear. Brown Creeper, Kinglets, Orange-crowned and Yellow-rumped warblers, and Bluebirds may show up for suet, peanuts, or shelled sunflower.

In the coming weeks as you come in for seed you will likely see some changes in the appearance of your usual bag. We are trying out a new seed company. Not to worry, though, as we are confident they are going to supply us with the same quality you have come to expect from The Wood Thrush Shop. In fact we have been impressed with the quality and service thus far and received some positive feedback from customers who’ve tried the new brand.

25lb. black oil sunflower.

25lb. black oil sunflower.

50lb. black oil sunflower.

50lb. black oil sunflower.

The reason for this change is due to the weekly nightmare we’ve experienced receiving our seed from Des Moines, IA via freight. Practically every week we see lots of broken bags (as many as 30 in one load), and sometimes partial loads have actually been lost. Years of absorbing losses and trying to work this out with the seed company and freight people unsuccessfully has precipitated the need for change.

And our mealworm customers will see a different container with their next purchase. We have moved away from styro cups and plastic lids to a durable, biodegradable, container. These containers will last a long time and as always we encourage you to bring them back for refills.

New biodegradable mealworm containers.

New biodegradable mealworm containers.

meal worms.jpg

February is National Birdfeeding Month so look for emails pertaining to a sale. If you’re not already taking part in Project Feeder Watch you may find it interesting and fun and something to do in February. Visit www.feederwatch.org for more info.